Tagged: sharing

Chief Instagram Officers

InstagramLast year I wanted to involve my students in sharing the learning taking place in my classroom. I decided to try this by creating a rotating “executive office” I dubbed the Chief Tweeting Officer (CTO) for each class. After recognizing (and giving in to) the growing popularity of Instagram, I decided to add another executive office this year, our Chief Instagram Officer (CIO). (So you know, I also have a Chief Operating Officer (COO), a Chief Distributions Officer (CDO), and a Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO) on my rotating executive staff. I serve as the CEO.)

Our class Surface tablet is still designated for use by our CTO. Instead of having both social media executives share the tablet, the Chief Instagram Officer uses my iPad 2. I wasn’t completely comfortable with this idea at first. I use my iPad quite a bit, and it syncs with all my email accounts, my Evernote, my Google Drive, and all my personal social media accounts. I love and trust my students, but I’m not sure I want them to have that much access to my information.

My solution to this problem is to lock the iPad to just the Instagram app using Guided Access. I love the way the Guided Access works because I can “gray out” any area on the app that I don’t want students to use. So far it is working pretty well. I introduced the role by talking about the need to share our story of learning over the course of the year. We discussed how pictures help tell stories and what types of things we could capture and share about our learning. We also discussed the things we shouldn’t share and talked about the need to represent ourselves, our class, and our school honestly and respectfully. I’m sure we’ll continue those discussions all year. You can check out the stream here.

I’m not sure if there are other middle-level classes using Instagram, but I’m hoping we’ll find a few to connect with and follow. I’m interested to see how the role will develop as the year goes and see what my students decide to share. I’m already finding it interesting and informative to see the pictures the boys capture and to read the captions they write. I’m learning much about their perspectives.

Here are a few of my favorite images so far:


 
 

One logistical thing I changed from last year is that my officers serve for a full week at a time this year instead of changing daily. This gives the students more time to grow comfortable in the role and to become more adept at using the tool to share our learning.

So what do you think? What questions or feedback do you have about the idea? I’d love to read your thoughts. If you are an educator, we’d love to connect with you or your class. You can find us sharing online here or here.

An Idea: ELA Quads

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by Illustrative Mathematics licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

One of the changes we’ve made in 6th grade this year is to combine our English and reading instruction into one English Language Arts (ELA) class. We still have two teachers and two classrooms. Marjorie focuses on writing instruction through Writers’ Workshop while I focus on reading through Readers’ Workshop, but instead of having separate classes and separate schedules. Two homerooms are scheduled to have us during a two-hour English Language Arts block. This is a step towards developing the humanities class we are planning to shift to in the future. I’m excited about the shift to (ELA) because it allows Marjorie and I to collaborate more closely integrating our teaching and it allows us greater flexibility and more control over individual student schedules.

With thirty-eight boys scheduled for a two-hour block of ELA at one time, we’ve been imagining ways to play with how our classes will flow and how boys will shift between the two workshops. We considered a block schedule grouping the boys and having them spend both hours with one teacher on alternating days, but we decided for now we prefer the boys both to read and write daily. We also prefer to divide up having our boys travel by homerooms.

In wrestling with these constraints, Marjorie and I designed a plan. Each boys will be assigned to an ELA quad. Within the quad each boy will have a reading partner and a writing partner, but their partners will differ depending on the workshop. The quads will travel together to the different classrooms and work together for small group lessons for the entire first trimester. The quad consists of boys A, B, C, and D. A and B are reading partners, and C and D are reading partners. A and D are writing partners, and B and C are writing partners.  The whole quad also doubles as a small group. At the end of the trimester we will “turnover the fruit basket” and place the boys in new quads with new partners. Because we are still getting to know the students and their personal learning needs, our first quads will be of mixed ability levels. However, we may adjust how we group the students as the year goes along.

I’m excited about the idea and the flexibility it affords us while providing some structure for the students. Our plan is to name each quad after an NFL team during the fall trimester, after an NBA team during the winter term, and after an MLB team during the spring third. (We want to avoid having groups of bluebirds and red birds.)

What do you think of the idea? What else do we need to consider? I’d love to receive your feedback about the ELA quad idea and ways we can make it better.


This is a pomodori post. My pomodori posts stem from my use of the Pomodoro Technique. I spend the first 25-minute interval writing a post and a second interval polishing, editing, formatting, tagging, and scheduling it. At the end of the second interval, the post is done.

A New Plan: Pomodori Posts

Pomodoro technique While in Atlanta for ISTE a couple of weeks ago, I spend lots of time with my friends Bill Ferriter and John Spencer. Bill and John are two of my favorite teacher bloggers. I never miss a post that either of them writes, and their writings have really helped me grow and develop as a teacher. Both of them have encouraged me greatly in my own blogging efforts. Bill helped me get this website up and working, and John has been one of the most frequent commenters and sharers of my work.

Hanging out with them (we shared a condo) was one of the high points of my ISTE experience. I learned so much through our conversations, and they constantly challenge my thinking. One of the coolest things about hanging out with them was the opportunity to watch them write. It’s cool to see Bill crafting posts through conversations, tweets, and questions making notes as he goes. It was also interesting to watch the way Bill manages his time, prioritizing writing and sharing. John, too, is a blogging master. I watched as he wrote an entire post in less than twenty minutes (with my interrupting him occasionally), and the post was brilliant. He has truly honed his craft. In fact, he’s developed himself into such a good writer that he rarely spends any time editing his posts.

I’ve been thinking about what I learned observing Bill and John at ISTE and about my own attempts at blogging. I’ve also been experimenting with and reading about personal productivity. I want to share more openly and blog more often about my teaching and learning. I’ve already started taking more notes on my learning using a Moleskine and creating drafts of things to blog about in Evernote. This is similar to the way Bill works. That should help when it comes to capturing my ideas. But I also need to write faster and let go of my writing more willingly like John does. Having considered this, I’m going to start posting more often using what I’m calling my pomodori post technique.

I’ve used Tomatoes for the past few months to help me be more productive during my planning, before school, and after school work time. I’m going to start using the Pomodoro Technique to write two posts a week. I’m going to limit the time I can spend on a past to two pomodori. I will spend the first pomodoro (25 minutes) writing each post. I’ll use the second pomodoro to edit mistakes, format the blog, polish my thoughts, add categories and tags, and add a photo to the post. At the end of the second pomodoro, I’ll schedule the post and walk away from it. I’ll tag each as a pomodori post. They will be somewhat similar to Bo Adams’ process posts, but I’m not going to name them as such in the title. I’m only going to tag them this way. I’m sure I’ll have to tweak the process as I go, but it’s a start.

So what do you think? What is the process you go through when you write a blog post? I’d love to read your thoughts on my plan.

A #LeadershipDay12 To-Do List

Today is #LeadershipDay12, a day identified by Scott McLeod to celebrate both Connected Educator Month and the 6th anniversary of his blog. Dr. McLeod is currently serving as the Director of Innovation for the Prairie Lakes Area Education Agency. He is also the Founding Director of the UCEA Center for the Advanced Study of Technology Leadership in Education (CASTLE) at the University of Kentucky. The goal of the Leadership Day 2012 is for educational bloggers to share ideas with school leaders about how “to use, think about, or be a leader regarding digital technologies.”

I am no expert in leadership or digital technologies, but I have learned much as an educator through my immersion in educational technology over the past few years. For this reason and thanks to some prodding from my friend Bob, I decided I’d contribute a post to the discussion. I hope someone finds it useful. For what it’s worth, I hold an M.Ed. in School Administration and Supervision from Freed-Hardeman University, and I serve as a 6th grade reading teacher in a 1:1 classroom.

Immerse yourself in reading. The world has shifted. We are educating today’s students for a world that is unknown. We’ve yet to discover the problems they’ll need to solve, and the jobs they’ll have do not yet exist. The way students learn has changed, and teaching and schooling needs to change, too. As a school leader you must inform yourself about educational innovation, learning technologies, and instructional leadership. You cannot lead that which you don’t understand so start researching, reading, and reflecting. If you aren’t already, start using an RSS reader to subscribe to blogs written by people who challenge your thinking and the status quo. Google Reader is my RSS aggregator of choice, and I like it because I am able to access my subscriptions on all my digital devices. (If you need some help getting started with this, please let me know. I’ll be happy to help you.) Do you need help finding blog subscriptions to follow? I subscribe to hundreds of blogs, but here’s a short list (in no particular order) of some that regularly challenge me:

I could go on and on, but these blogs are a great place to start.

Share what you learn. It’s not enough to research, read, and reflect. You need to talk about these ideas. You need to write about them. You must share what you learn in order to truly own it. There are many ways to do this. You can use Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Google+ to connect with educators around the world and exchange ideas. Consider starting your own blog as a place to reflect. More importantly, start discussing these ideas with your faculty and administrative team. Talk about them over lunch, in the hallways, and at meetings. Learning about innovation and technology is great, but change won’t happen until these ideas begin percolating in your school.

Try something new. Don’t wait for district leadership to send down the next initiative. Make some changes now. Pilot a 1:1 classroom in your building. Ask a teacher to create a class blog and have her students publish their learning to the world. Unblock a social media site and encourage a few teachers to use it in their instruction. Work with a teacher to design a class using Project Based Learning. Forge a partnership with a school on another continent. Flip a few of your faculty meetings. Take a risk. Many teachers and administrators want to innovate, but they feel they need permission first.

Lead the way. You are in a unique position to radically reshape your school. Be bold. Lead.