#MCHunter Day 2: First Day in Office

As regular readers of this blog know, I am taking a Master Class with John Hunter this week at The Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence. John is the creator of the World Peace Game and featured in the movie World Peace and Other Fourth Grade Achievements. One of the unique aspects about the Memphis class is that it there is a group of students who are playing the game each morning, and Master Class members have the opportunity to watch the game in action. Then we spend the afternoon debriefing and reflecting on our own practice with John and Jamie Baker.

Yesterday, the adult observers were encouraged to look for how to handle “unknowing,” team development, Mr. Hunter’s use of his strengths, and how learning happens. I attempted to keep these suggestions in mind as I watched the game unfold.

The game portion of today started with the students going over the day’s crisis report. The report identified the following 22 crises that Mr. Hunter has embedded into the game:

  • a border land dispute
  • an air defense scramble
  • a natural disaster
  • a rebel insurgency
  • religious tensions
  • endangered species
  • drone attacks
  • a territorial ownership dispute
  • an oil embargo
  • arms proliferation
  • a territorial waters dispute
  • a forced alliance
  • two separate global warming issues
  • ethnic cleansing
  • mercenary and rogue military actions
  • an oil spill
  • a toxic chemical spill
  • a Star Wars missile defense conflict
  • an undersea mining dispute
  • a sunken civilization artifact discovery
  • cyber-hacking
  • an ancestor burial dilemma
  • an oil well gusher blowout

How’s that for a to-do list on one’s first day in office? 🙂

I love the game’s complexity, and it was great to hear John’s philosophy on the need for complexity. Often, in teaching we divide the learning into smaller parts in order to make it simpler for the student to understand and master. As someone stated “we pre-chew their food.” The problem with this is that the world is incredibly complex and it’s rare that we are able to focus on just one individual task at a time. By designing the game with significant complexity, Hunter requires the kids to tackle multiple tasks at once and rely on their creativity as much as their analysis. He’s not teaching them to multi-task, but simulating the true complexity that already exists in the world.

As a group, we adults observed students responding in several different ways to this. Some seemed paralyzed by it all. Others were confused. Some slowed down and approached things carefully and methodically, and a few simply jumped in with their “to-do lists” and tried to accomplish something. It was an interesting dynamic. The room was full of activity and busyness, but I’m uncertain as to whether it was productive. I’m curious to see how the gameplay will develop.

Students approached their lack of knowing and understanding in different ways, and it wasn’t easy to know how they were doing without really knowing them personally. I think this really speaks to the need for strong relationships with students. I also noticed that John has a gift for one-on-one connections. He is very intentional about seeking out individuals to ask questions, offer encouragement, and make observations. He also has a way of expressing genuine interest in each individual. It’s quite remarkable.

During the afternoon our cohort debriefed with John and Jamie about what we saw in the game, and John shared with us some tools he uses with his students. (I’m working on a separate post about these.) then, we sat together and shared our responses to the “homework” questions. Teachers are extraordinary people. Listening to my peers share deeply about how they teach and why they do so was a beautiful experience, and I learned so much from them. And this morning, as I reflect on yesterday and this experience, I must confess I am extremely proud to be a teacher.

One thought on “#MCHunter Day 2: First Day in Office”

Comments are closed.